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Lesson: Folly, Vice and Everything Nice


Author: Ivy B
Subject Area: Reading/Language Arts
Grade Level: 11 - 12

Introduction

We are entering the 18th century in our literature studies. The period between 1660 and 1785 was a time of expansion for England; the empire increased in size and changed internally. Political and social changes led to new ways of thinking during the time period known as the Restoration. The changes that occurred during this time greatly affected literature. We are going to explore some of those changes as we explore the literature. The activities we do online will focus on satire. They are designed to help you understand what satire is and how it is used. Once you have a firm grasp on the definition of satire and the different uses for it we will begin to explore satire from the 18th century.

Goals

Strategy tutor is designed to help you explore satire in many different forms. You are going to develop the common characteristics of satire by exploring first folly and vice then Juvenalian and Horatian satire. The goal is for you to learn the differences between a gentle ridicule of follies and formal attacks on vices. These activities will strengthen your understanding of satire so that you are able to apply it to satirical work from the 18th century. You will be assigned a partner to work with throughout these activities. You are expected to participate in both on-line and class discussion. Once you have a completed each activity you will discuss common characteristics of satire as a class. Once arriving at these at these common characteristics, I will combine partner pairs in to small groups. Each group will create a short skit with at least three characters. You will present these during class. The dialogue should give a snapshot into contemporary teenage life critiquing human follies or vices through the use of irony, ridicule or humor.

Directions

Directions will be more detailed in each activity. Activity One: Folly? Vice? Everything Nice? Activity Two: Horace and Juvenal - Two types of satire Activity Three: Satire and all that Jazz


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Activity: Folly? Vice? Everything Nice?


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Goals

The goal of this activity is to understand the definition of folly and vice. What is a folly? What is a vice? How are they displayed in our everyday lives? You will view images that display different examples of both folly and vice. You will predict if the image is one of the other and justify your decision. You will share your predictions.

Directions

1. View the images on our class blog. 2. Discuss those images with your partner. 3. Predict whether the image is an example of folly or vice? Why? 4. If you can not decide based on the definition provided I want you both to explore the definitions further. You must be able to fully support your choices. *Use Strategy Tutor Rubric to help you make predictions. Also view Rubric's tips on Media Literacy to help you develop your ideas. Please provide your predictions by selecting strategy "predict". After predicting I would like for you to click on the strategy "feeling" and share how this information makes you feel. Again, use Rubric as your strategy tutor.



Activity: Juvenal and Horace Save the Day!


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Goals

Today I want you and your partner to explore two different types of satire. Juvenal and Horace were satirist who wrote two very different types of satire. That's all I am going to tell you. I want you to explore the internet and find out what types of satire each created and report back.

Directions

1. Google Juvenal 2. Google Horace 3. Juvenalian Satire and Horatian satire are also key words that you can google to find more information. 4. Use Keisha as your strategy tutor to make predictions on the information you find. How reliable are your sources? (Don't forget to type in your predictions!) 5. After you have made predictions I want you to summarize the information you found on Juvenal and Horace. What types of satire do they write? How are they similar and/or different? Summarize your information in to three to six sentences. Use Pablo as your strategy tutor. 6. Do you have any questions? If so please select the question strategy and write up your questions. This will help us when we come together as a class.



Activity: Satire and all that Jazz


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Goals

Today we are going to figure out some common characteristics of satire. You will be working with your partner to develop key ideas behind satire by viewing/listening to several different types of satire. As a class we are going to develop the key ideas together!

Directions

Use the viewing/listening guide provided in class. What type of satire are displayed in each clip that you watch? Where is the criticism focused? What are at least two different types of satire found in each clip? See the viewing listening guide to make these notes! Select the summarize strategy to summarize your findings. Answer this question: What common characteristics did you find in each clip? What do you need to know in order to write a satire? What do you need to know about the work you are reading/viewing/listening to in order to understand satire? Use Pablo as your strategy tutor!




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